We had a look around the handicraft scene and made our find with crochet artist "Geeky Hooker" working as a health care professional by day and crochet ninja by night.

TH: Tell us a little bit about yourself.
GH: My name is Cindy, I'm 31 years old, living in Houston, TX. I crochet goofy little characters!

Batman Twoface hi-res.jpg

Baymax bandaid hi-res.jpg

TH: How did you come about the idea to crochet miniature heroes?
GH: I first had the idea when I was about to go to San Diego Comic-Con for the first time. I wanted to create little super heroes and decided to crochet them. Since then it's gotten a bit out of control - whenever if I think something is fun and interesting, I'll try to make it out of yarn. For exemple I made a little Frida Kahlo for an art swap once, because I was DYING to make a tiny unibrow for her, and that was less than 1% of the work needed, to make a tiny Frida. It seriously involved just ONE single line of lightweight yarn across the forehead. I could've picked anything out of a list of ideas my friend gave me, but the unibrow got me. 

frida hi-res.jpg

TH: Isn't it difficult to crochet these tiny creatures?
GH: Sometimes I think something should be relatively easy to make, and the next thing I know I'm pulling my hair out trying to stitch on a tiny little belt buckle for the eighth time. Sometimes I try not to make them too complicated, especially when I plan to use them for dropping in public places. I consider how much time it would take to make them. The plain fact is that sometimes the critters go missing, so I'd rather not make anything too detailed or time-consuming if there's a risk that it could be lost. But then I get carried away and make something more elaborate anyway!

Hellboy hi-res.jpg

Captain America hi-res.jpg

TH: How do you manage to get so much attention with your tiny creations?
GH: My biggest project that I do on an annual basis is my "critter drops" at San Diego Comic-Con. I've been fortunate enough to get badges to the convention for the last 5 years, so I'll start months in advance to make a good collection of characters to bring with me to San Diego. Then I drop them anonymously around the convention area for people to find. 

Leia hi-res.jpg

chewbacca hi-res.jpg

TH: Do you have critics as well? What do they say about your art?
GH: Everyone have their own way of seeing things. Here in Houston we have the Rothko Chapel, which is a famous art building that is considered by many to be a great place for inspiration. It's this octagonal room with massive black panels on each wall, and it's meant to be a contemplative space for people of all beliefs. I thought it was depressing as hell. Other visitors were silently looking into the black paintings and seemed to have found something really meaningful in them. I stared at them and wanted to go home and eat a gallon of ice cream. So I'm clearly in the category of people who don't get it. Likewise I'm sure the reactions to my work range from "OMG how cute!" to "WTF what a waste of time and yarn." But isn't it all the millions of different perspectives, that make the world tick?

doctor who hi-res.jpg

groot hi-res.jpg

link hi-res.jpg

spock hi-res.jpg

superman hi-res.jpg

hi-res.jpg

Find out more about Geeky Hooker: Website, Facebook and Twitter.

Are you a fan of handicarft art? Then you might be interested in our Creative Invite: Design an ugly Christmas sweater for "Circus Halligalli"